From left, UNB assistant dean of science Katherine Barclay, physics professor Ben Newling and chemistry instructor Valerie Reeves have received awards recognizing their dedication to innovative teaching.

UNB Salutes Three Changemakers With Teaching Awards

Three University of New Brunswick educators are being saluted by students and colleagues for transforming the classroom experience.

Assistant dean of science Katherine Barclay, physics professor Ben Newling and chemistry instructor Valerie Reeves have received awards recognizing their dedication to innovative teaching.

“I offer my thanks and congratulations to these fine educators for their passion and dedication to teaching at the University of New Brunswick. They are clearly making UNB an even better place for learning and deserve the high honour that comes with being recognized by colleagues and students,”

 

UNB President Eddy Campbell

Whether it is fostering a positive environment, designing a course to better serve the diverse needs of students or flipping the classroom dynamic to increase participation, these teachers are not afraid to implement new teaching methods.

Dr. Newling has been selected for the Neil Scott Educational Leadership Award by UNB Senates. The award recognizes those who encourage excellence in teaching.

His willingness to share his trials and successes to help others receive the benefit of his teaching experience has made him a leader in the UNB teaching community. Dr. Newling is a previous winner of the Association of Atlantic Universities Distinguished Teaching Award in 2016, as well as the Allan P. Stuart Award for Excellence in Teaching at UNB in 2015.

Dr. Reeves and Dr. Barclay were recognized at UNB’s recent convocation ceremonies with this year’s Allan P. Stuart Award for Excellence in Teaching Award. The award recognizes outstanding teaching on the basis of nominations from students and faculty members at UNB.

Dr. Reeves did both her undergraduate degree in chemistry and doctorate in forestry at UNB. After starting teaching at UNB in 2003, she recognized quickly that the existing structure of first-year chemistry classes wasn’t working for students in every faculty, so sought changes to ensure student success.

Dr. Barclay did her first degree at UNB, completing her bachelor of science in biology-physics. Dr. Barclay teaches first-year human physiology and second-year pathophysiology courses. Her classes underpin what students will have to know later on in their degrees and by ensuring the students learn what they need she is providing better opportunities for academic success.

Leave a Reply