How to Enjoy the Eclipse in Freddy Beach

How to Enjoy the Eclipse in Freddy Beach

Partial Eclipse of the Heart???

 

Today will see a rare event occur in Fredericton and around the world…literally. A solar eclipse is happening today in the skies above Freddy Beach. The skies will begin to darken at about 2:45 this afternoon across New Brunswick as the province experiences a partial eclipse of the sun. The eclipse then peaks at 3:37pm and ends at 4:53pm.

It is the first time we have had a total eclipse in North America in about four decades and we’ll be getting a partial eclipse here and we haven’t really had a good one here in the last 17 or 18 years. Fred-E-Scene has compiled some information and events in Fredericton concerning the celestial event.

What Are Solar Eclipses?

 

A solar eclipse is a spectacular sight and a rare astronomical event. Each one is only visible from a limited area.

An eclipse of the Sun happens when the New Moon moves between the Sun and Earth, blocking out the Sun’s rays and casting a shadow on parts of Earth.

The Moon’s shadow is not big enough to engulf the entire planet, so the shadow is always limited to a certain area (see map illustrations below). This area changes during the course of the eclipse because the Moon and Earth are in constant motion: Earth continuously rotates around its axis while it orbits the Sun, and the Moon orbits Earth. This is why solar eclipses seem to travel from one place to another

Types of Solar Eclipses

There are 4 different types of solar eclipses. How much of the Sun’s disk is eclipsed, the eclipse magnitude, depends on which part of the Moon’s shadow falls on Earth.

  • Partial solar eclipses occur when the Moon only partly obscures the Sun’s disk and casts only its penumbra on Earth.
  • Annular solar eclipses take place when the Moon’s disk is not big enough to cover the entire disk of the Sun, and the Sun’s outer edges remain visible to form a ring of fire in the sky. An annular eclipse of the Sun takes place when the Moon is near apogee, and the Moon’s antumbra falls on Earth.
  • Total solar eclipses happen when the Moon completely covers the Sun, and it can only take place when the Moon is near perigee, the point of the Moon’s orbit closest to Earth. You can only see a total solar eclipse if you’re in the path where the Moon’s casts its darkest shadow, the umbra.
  • Hybrid Solar Eclipses, also known as annular-total eclipses, are the rarest type. They occur when the same eclipse changes from an annular to a total solar eclipse, and/or vice versa, along the eclipse’s path.

Solar Eclipses Mainly Look Partial

Solar eclipses are only visible from within the area on Earth where the Moon’s shadow falls, and the closer you are to the center of the shadow’s path, the bigger the eclipse looks.

Solar eclipses are usually named for their darkest, or maximum, point. The exception is the hybrid eclipse.

The darkest point of solar eclipses is only visible from a small area. In most places and for most of the duration, total, annular, and hybrid eclipses look like a partial solar eclipse.

Link: https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar-eclipse.html

Eclipse Viewing Safety

Viewing Events

Science East Science Centre
668 Brunswick St, Fredericton, NB
2:30PM – 5:00PM

Want to explore the eclipse in a fun, safe and informative way with family and friends? Visit Science East for Fredericton’s Eclipse Viewing Party Aug. 21st ! We’ll provide solar viewing glasses from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, fun facts & activities to learn more about this spectacular celestial phenomenon. Eclipse begins at 2:35pm, peaks at 3:37pm and ends at 4:53pm. Event is free with admission.

University of New Brunswick
UNB Power Plant Field
948 College Hill Rd, Fredericton, NB
2:00PM – 5:00PM

The public will be able to view the eclipse through a special solar-filtered telescope. A limited supply of solar viewers, provided the the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, will be available for sharing amongst the spectators.

Hanwell Recreation Park
Hanwell, NB
2:30PM – 4:45PM

The public will be able to view the eclipse through a special solar-filtered telescope. A limited supply of solar viewers, provided the the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, will be available for sharing amongst the spectators.

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